BEJournal presents 4 tips in collaboration with Canon Collective, for photographers eager to take advantage of the Golden Hour—also referred to as Magic Hour—during daylight savings (ADEST).

A kind of golden hour one remembers for a life time… Everything was touched with magic.”

Margaret Bourke-White

{Golden Hour} is the period of daylight just after sunrise or before sunset, when the light is redder and softer and can give photographs a warm and inviting quality. A preferred shoot time of photographers for the quality of the light, the Golden Hour gives images a little extra glow.

Canon has pulled together tips and device recommendations to make sure you get the shot you want and make most of the magical hues.

At dusk or dawn

Take advantage of longer, warmer evenings, and shoot during the golden light last thing in the day. You can combat the lower light with devices like the new EOS 90D, which has high-speed auto-focus and the latest DIGIC 8 processor to ensure your photos have great resolution, no matter the light.

Raindrops alight a nearby pine, a delicate detail visible by backlight. Photo Credit © Inga Yandell
Raindrops alight a nearby pine, a delicate detail visible by backlight. Photo Credit © Inga Yandell

A little bit of flare

Most of the time we don’t want flare when shooting. In the Golden Hour, however, it makes for some beautiful shots. All lenses flare differently, but typically telephoto or zoom lenses flare more than their fixed counterparts. The EOS R with RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens makes for a killer combination for shots where you want to have flare. You can create flare either by backlighting your subject with the sun so that your subject is only partially covering the light or by positioning the sun so that it rests just outside of the frame or fully inside it, depending on where you want to flare the appear.

Face the light

The Golden Hour is the perfect time to shoot portrait photography, as it’s the most flattering natural light. Have the person you’re shooting face the sun – it’s one of the few times they can as the diffused light means they won’t need to squint and the light won’t bounce off them. Shoot your model with a larger aperture lens, such as the RF 85mm f/1.2L USM, as this will allow you to create a lovely bokeh while keeping the focus on your subject.

No people, no problem! Try capturing a portrait of a plant as its petals unfold, or a praying mantis enjoing the radiating warmth of sun-soaked wood, as dusk approaches. Photo Credit © Inga Yandell
No people, no problem! Try capturing a portrait of a plant as its petals unfold, or a praying mantis at dusk enjoing the radiating warmth of sun-soaked wood. Photo Credit © Inga Yandell

Keep on keeping on

Once the Golden Hour begins, and it starts pretty quickly, the light will change dramatically and the window to capture images is limited. To make the most of the light and all the different shades and shadows, keep snapping the shutter for the entire hour. You might even want to try your hand at time lapse photography with Canon’s new EOS 90D that lets you shoot full HD at 120 frames per second. Pair this photography powerhouse with the EF 24-105 f/4L lens and you’ll be sure to capture that glimmering sunset in all its glory. 

As the light fades be primed to profit from the encroaching darkness. Like a velvet cloak this window of opportunity creates a backdrop which accentuates softer hues. Photo Credit © Inga Yandell
As the light fades be ready for the encroaching darkness. Like a velvet cloak this window of opportunity creates a backdrop which accentuates softer hues. Photo Credit © Inga Yandell

Visit Canon Collective for more tips on how to get the best shots this spring.

All images in this article were taken on the EOS R (RRP: AUD $2,700) with RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens (RRP: AUD $1,749) supplied by Canon Australia.